Artists
Eberhard Weber Joe Pass Kenny Clare
Information
Genre
Bop
Release Date
01.01.1970
Information

"Joe Pass looks like somebody's uncle and plays guitar like nobody's business.” So said New York Magazine about the man considered to be one of the greatest jazz guitarists of the 20th century. Pass’s masterful melodic counterpoint and quicksilver improvisational style flow throughout “Intercontinental”.

Since the American had a first-class bassist in Eberhard Weber at his side during his June 1970 MPS session in Germany’s idyllic Black Forest, Pass could concentrate on playing the melody and the chords. Weber, who comes from Stuttgart, Germany, would soon develop his own electric bass, but at this point he was still playing the traditional acoustic contrabass. Third in the group was British drummer Kenny Clare (not to be confused with American drummer Kenny Clarke). Pass chose the program for the recording, mixing standards with originals. It’s amazing how such typical big band pieces as “Stompin’ at the Savoy” and “Lil’ Darlin’” sound in trio; Pass and company swing like they were Count Basie and his orchestra. The 1970 liner notes designate “I Love You” as the album’s high point: “It is a small jewel for guitar, bass, and drums. Eberhard Weber has a short but exciting solo. Kenny Clare attacks with elaborate brush work throughout. Joe Pass plays with a feather-light sense of swing. His refined lines have a singable quality to them, and he often phrases as if he were a saxophonist.”

Artists
Eberhard Weber Joe Pass Kenny Clare
Information
Genre
Bop
Release Date
01.01.1970